IDEA Conference Neighborhood Award Winners

Each year at the conference, outstanding neighborhoods are recognized for their leadership, projects, and beautification efforts! Check out our past winners to learn more about the amazing work being done by neighborhoods across Muncie.

Neighborhood Awards:

2018

Whitely Community Food Pantry
2017 Neighborhood Project of the Year

According to Feeding America, food insecurity exists when people lack sustainable physical or economic access to enough safe, nutritious, and socially acceptable food for a healthy and productive life. This neighborhood association felt a strong need to actively address the issue of food insecurity through the mobilization of resources to create a Hunger Free Zone. In 2017, over 200 individuals were provided healthy, nutritional food through the establishment of a food pantry. The result of partnership building and active fundraising efforts, the Whitely Community Food Pantry has added value to the lives of Whitely’s most vulnerable residents.

Clifford Clemons, Blaine-Southeast Neighborhood Association President
2017 Neighborhood Leader of the Year

He experienced set-back early on in the development of the neighborhood association due to low attendance and lack of interest, and yet he persisted. Over the last few years he built a strong, dedicated association committed to improving the neighborhood’s quality of life. In 2017 these efforts translated to the successful installation of a walking track at the park that the neighborhood owns and maintains, as well as several community building events including neighborhood cleanups, holiday parties, and an annual back-to-school event in which neighborhood children receive free school supplies. This Neighborhood Leader’s super power is bringing people together, a testament to their neighborhood’s tagline, “It’s the Unity of the Community that gets the work done.”

2019

Minnetrista Neighborhood Association Urban Garden Project
2018 Neighborhood Project of the Year

According to pioneer of the organic farming and urban agriculture movements Michael Ableman, “There is a quiet revolution stirring in our food system. It is not happening so much on the distant farms that still provide us with the majority of our food; it is happening in cities, neighborhoods, and towns. It has evolved out of the basic need that every person has to know their food, and to have some sense of control over its safety and security.” 

In the summer of 2018, over 1000 pounds of produce was grown and distributed to surrounding neighbors and businesses as well as to The Soup Kitchen of Muncie, Bridges Community Services and local churches and twelve-step programs. The community garden also boosted morale within the neighborhood and gave participants a sense of accomplishment.

Lezlie McCrory, South Central Neighborhood President
2018 Neighborhood Leader of the Year

She worked tirelessly over the last several years to build community and engage residents in neighborhood projects. In 2018 these efforts translated to the successful installation of several blocks of trees, flowers, and other greenery along the South Walnut St. corridor. This beautification effort truly was a massive undertaking involving partnerships with key stakeholders including the City of Muncie, utility companies, local businesses, and residents. When you drive down South Walnut today you see a vast improvement from a barren sea of grey to a cared for streetscape full of color and life.  This Neighborhood Leader’s super power is persistence, truly working year after year to make South Central a place where neighbors want to live, dream and grow. When asked how they would describe this neighborhood leader, neighborhood association members and peers said, that they lead with enthusiasm, encouragement, and tenacity. And for those Parks & Rec fans, I also heard: “Leslie Knope wishes she was Lezlie McCrory!”

2020

Riverside-Normal City’s $2 Tour of the Village
2019 Neighborhood Project of the Year award

Starting a new neighborhood initiative or event is daunting. There is no precedent to draw from and you feel like you’re just treading water as you pull together partners, plan logistics, and figure out fundraising. Throughout the process though, partnerships become key to overall success and drawing in the support and active involvement of neighborhood businesses is a true asset to any neighborhood initiative. In the spring of 2019, a dedicated group of resident leaders and local business owners began meeting regularly to plan an event that was meant to highlight the neighborhood, its unique characteristics and assets, and its commercial corridor. Six months later, University Avenue was closed to motorists for one beautiful, summer afternoon as hundreds of people descended on the Village to experience the food and culture of this historic neighborhood hub. The success of this event is not just the exposure it brought to the neighborhood, but in the newly formed Village Alliance that is actively working to improve quality of life and advocate for the area.

Stan Geidel, Country Village-Creekwood Neighborhood Association Secretary
2019 Neighborhood Leader of the Year.

His leadership can be seen in the way they use their personal expertise to better the community. Over the last two years, their neighborhood began the process of revitalizing its community space, including plans to replace an aging playground, expand a small parking area and add a recreational trail. While the current board was able to envision these plans, finding ways to fund and initiate the project was daunting. This is where this resident leader stepped up to lead the project by utilizing their grant writing expertise and to prepare a timeline and funding plan. He also revived the neighborhood Easter Egg hunt, handed out hundreds of popsicles during the neighborhood Halloween festivities, and gave their time and used their personnel equipment to clean up the neighborhood basketball court and assist in the construction of a gaga pit for the children of the neighborhood.

According to neighbors, “Whether he is seeing an immediate need that he uniquely has the skill to address, or giving of his time on projects that don’t even directly affect him, Stan has jumped in with two feet to the betterment of his community.”

Most trash collected:

SPRING 2018 WINNER
Riverside-Normal City Neighborhood Association
Spring 2017 Cleanup: 25,220 pounds of trash collected!
FALL 2018 WINNER
Old West End Neighborhood Association

Fall 2017 Cleanup: 21,840 pounds of trash collected!
SPRING 2019 WINNER
Old West End Neighborhood Association
Spring 2018 Cleanup: 18,120 pounds of trash collected!

FALL 2019 WINNER
South Central Neighborhood Association
Fall 2018 Cleanup: 12,060 pounds of trash collected!
SPRING 2020 WINNER
South Central Neighborhood Association
Spring 2019 Cleanup: 26,780 pounds of trash collected!

FALL 2020 WINNER
Old West End Neighborhood Association
Fall 2018 Cleanup: 20,040 pounds of trash collected!